Asia

Afghanistan

Extracts (2003)

A free country, but only for half of its nationals. Although it is necessary to steer clear of ethnocentric assumptions, I sniffed out a few difficulties with my project to produce portraits of women in the area…

I was reminded of an observation made by a young Berber woman that had disturbed me twenty years previously, during a stay in the High Atlas mountain ranges of Morocco: “Where I come from, the most coveted status in terms of female autonomy is that of the war widow – on top of real liberty, this confers the right to a pension!” Over here, there is no real liberty so to speak, and even fewer pensions, but there is no shortage of widows. Indeed, it proved easier to convince widows to pose for photos and drawings; on top of this, these ladies recounted to me, through the testimony of their destinies, the last twenty-five years of Afghan conflicts. There was the widow whose husband had been executed by the Russians; the one who had lost her husband due to US collateral damage; two others whose husbands had been killed, one by the Taliban, the other by a rocket during the civil war; or else this last woman, separated from her husband who had been pent up in Guantanamo…

-in Afghanes-

Carte d'Afghanistan, 2004. Gouache sur papier, 64 x 50 cm

Kobra, 2004. Gouache sur papier, 34 x 37 cm - Gouache sur papier, 46 x 37 cm

Ruya, Afghanistan, 2004. Photo rehaussé à la gouache, 19,5 x 29 cm
X